Resume Help Sefanur Taşdelen

Resume Introduction [+Intro Paragraph Examples]

Most people would encourage you to start at the beginning if you don't know how to begin a resume.

But…

That's not going to help you at all.

 

In reality, the beginning to your resume should be written last. It will be much easier to select the items you want to highlight after your full document is complete.

 

This post will teach you how to construct a resume introduction paragraph that will keep recruiters reading all the way to the conclusion. Ready?

 

Choosing a Resume Introduction

When you meet someone and the first word that comes out of your lips is "what up?" you can bet that a lot of people will walk away. Your resume is in the same boat.

However, before deciding what you want to say, you must consider how you will express it. What is your main message, and what are your best-selling points?

Those are the details you'll want to mention in your profile on your resume.

The good news is that it makes no difference what industry you work in. The rules for writing a resume beginning are the same whether you're in marketing or medicine.

You can choose between two types of resume profiles, depending on your experience and skills:

Resume Objective

If you're just starting out in your job or have minimal experience, the resume objective is the best way to start. It's also a good option for people who want to shift careers.

The goal of the resume aim is to demonstrate that you have the abilities and knowledge to be a successful employee.

Here's an example of an excellent resume aim for someone applying for an internship who has no prior work experience:

Resume Introduction Example

University English student with strong writing and communication abilities interested in pursuing a career in journalism. In one month, I published three award-winning articles for the university newsletter and one guest blog post that had 100,000 visitors. At the Daily Gazette internship, I'm eager to improve my research and interviewing skills.

 

This sample emphasizes the candidate's abilities and motivation to demonstrate that they are a worthwhile investment of the employer's time.

What if, after several years on the job, you decide to change your career focus? This example will teach you how to begin your career change resume with an objective:

 

Sample Resume Introduction

With 4 years of corporate experience in social media management and advertising campaigns, I am an accomplished marketing specialist. Looking to use industry talents and abilities to raise exposure and sales for a local non-profit through low-cost or no-cost marketing methods.

Even though this candidate is switching industries, the focus is on the talents and experience that the NGO can gain from.

 

Resume Summary

Anyone with several years of experience or who is still in the early stages of their career should use a resume summary as their resume introduction.

The resume summary emphasizes your previous work experience and gained talents to show that you're the best applicant for the job.

Here's an example of a great resume summary in a resume introduction:

Intro for a Resume

Exiting project manager with more than 5 years of experience leading mid-sized teams on high-level projects. Excellent relationship-building and management skills that enable projects to be delivered at least $10K under budget and 10% faster than expected. As a senior project manager at Acme, I'm hoping to put my project management talents to good use.

 

This sample immediately highlights the candidate's essential talents and quantitative achievements, enticing the hiring manager to continue reading.

So, how can you write a resume introduction that is as good as the ones above? We'll demonstrate.

 

Summary of Qualifications

A summary of qualifications is a bulleted list of accomplishments, abilities, and relevant experience that demonstrates your suitability for the position. Consider it a career overview in the form of a bullet point paragraph that is easy to skim.

Let's take the resume summary from before and turn it into a qualification’s summary.

 

Sample Introductions for a Resume

-Exiting project manager with more than 5 years of experience leading mid-sized teams on high-level projects.

-Excellent managerial and relationship-building abilities.

-Projects were delivered at least $10K under budget and 10% faster than expected.

-As a senior project manager at Acme, I'm hoping to put my project management talents to good use.

 

Isn't that easy? Simply rewrite your resume's top 4-5 highlights into brief bullet bullets.

 

Resume Headline

Having trouble putting your resume's information onto a one- or two-page template? Make a headline for your CV. A resume headline, also known as a resume title, is a short sentence that appears at the top of your resume and conveys your professional identity while also emphasizing your abilities. It'll be listed under your contact info.

Consider the following examples:

 

Introduction for a Resume: Example

-Clio Award-winning marketing manager with more than seven years of expertise.

-Security expert with OSCP certification and more than 5 years of experience.

-Project manager completes projects 10% faster than expected

-CNA with good team management skills who is bilingual and CPR and BLS certified.

 

So, how can you write a resume introduction that is as good as the ones above? We'll demonstrate.

 

Start With The Rest of Your Resume

Just because your resume's opening line is at the top of the page doesn't mean you can ignore it throughout the rest of the document. In fact, it's a smart rule of thumb to save your resume introduction till the conclusion.

Why?

Because, in order to get the most bang for your buck, your resume beginning must relate to the remainder of your resume parts.

 

Other elements of your resume, such as work experience, skills, education, and other sections, can assist you flesh out your accomplishments and important skills. Then, in your resume introduction, underline those in your summary or objective.

 

Writing a Resume Introduction

It's only half the battle to figure out whether to write a summary or an objective. Now it's up to you to decide what you're going to write.

Here are some pointers to help you build a more appealing resume introduction:

-Keep it short and sweet. You don't need more than three or four strong sentences.

-Make your resume's first paragraph specific to the job you're applying for. Make a cheat sheet out of the job post to focus on the qualities they're looking for. For extra brownie points, leave off the company's name.

-For a more ATS-friendly resume template, add action words to your statements and resume keywords.

-Demonstrate your worth. Finish with a comment about how you'd like to offer value to the firm and demonstrate to the employer that this isn't simply another job for you.

 

When you're finished, don't forget to proofread. Nothing is more frustrating than a few typos destroying the impression you worked so hard to create.